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Privacy Policy

Privacy Policy

Micah Data Protection, Security and Privacy

Who is Micah?

Micah is a global network and movement, with members in 93 countries currently, and mailing contacts in over 100 countries.

How does Micah collect information, contact details?

Member information:

  • An interested organisation or individual contacts Micah either via the web site, email or through attendance of an event. They complete a membership application form that asks for their organisation information and seeks permission to  retain the information to use in mailings and network connections.
  • The general information of the members (see below) is stored on the Micah web site (contact details are only accessible via a member log in), so as to allow the network to search and connect with one another.
    • Name
    • Contact Details
    • Web site
    • Introductory paragraph
    • Logo
  • Member contact details and correspondence information is stored on the Micah CRM online database (called KEPLA), which is a secure programme only accessible through log in. Only members of the Micah staff team have access to this information.
  • Members may ask to be connected to other members within their county or country of work. This is part of the network role and responsibility.
  • Each member appoints a focal person who is tasked with being the conduit of information flow between the member organisation and Micah. The focal person forwards relevant mailings to the wider staff pool and partners. Staff and partners of the organisation may choose to sign up directly for mailings as well.
  • In some larger organisations, the focal person sends Micah a list of all staff who would like to receive the Micah mailings.

Contact Information:

  • Micah staff and members may meet with many organisations and individuals during the course of their work. This can be at:
    • Micah events, member events or strategic events Micah is invited to attend
    • Onsite meetings
    • Email and/or virtual meetings
  • Whenever a business card exchange is undertaken, Micah confirms with the contact that they will be included in the monthly newsletter mailing.
  • Whenever an email is received requesting to be linked to Micah, a confirmation email is returned informing the contact that they have been linked to the monthly newsletter and that they can unsubscribe directly off the mailing list if they no longer wish to receive it.
  • At Micah events, all participants are registered formally and requested on site to sign a registration confirmation form that will sign them up to the Micah newsletter.  They are invited to opt out if they so wish, either by not signing the form or by unsubscribing online.

How does Micah use information collected?

Micah never shares information with any third party. All information is strictly held within the network for networking enrichment, and internal information sharing.

Members can update their own information via a password protect log-in service on the Micah web site or via the mailing update option at the bottom of all Micah mailings.

Members can opt to remove any visible evidence of their membership for any reason. On application they are required to confirm whether they should be visible or not on the Micah site.

Event registration information is only available to the event manager.

Compliance to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR): 25th May 2018

Micah has invited all members and contacts on our database to opt out if they no longer wish to receive mailings. A full information notice has been sent in May 2018, informing all of the new GDPR, and their rights and our responsibilities.

Micah commitment to data security

Micah has a secure CRM database called Kepla and uses MailChimp services to ensure all contacts can opt out (unsubscribe) at any time.

How to contact us

Should you have any queries or concerns about our privacy and security protocols please contact us by e-mail: info  at micahglobal.org

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Contact us: info@micahglobal.org
Registered Charity: 1103048
Registered Company: 4669640
Registered in the United Kingdom

© 2020 Micah Global

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Global Consultation 2021

Global Consultation 2021

The 8th Micah Global Consultation will take place in
September 2021. More details to follow by January 2021

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Contact us: info@micahglobal.org
Registered Charity: 1103048
Registered Company: 4669640
Registered in the United Kingdom

© 2020 Micah Global

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Annual Financial Contribution

Annual Financial Contribution

Thank you for making your annual financial contribution as a member of Micah

Your support is crucial and will enable us to together impact leaders and communities around the world. There are various ways to make financial contributions:

 Direct Transfer to Micah's Bank Account:

You can make a transfer directly to Micah’s GBP bank account.
The Co-operative Bank PLC
IBAN Number: GB81CPBK 089299 65114559
Swift code: CPBKGB22
Business Direct, P O Box 250
Skelmersdale WN8 6WT, UK
Sort Code: 08-92-99
Account number: 65114559
Account name: The Micah Network

Note: For regular monthly, quarterly or annual contributions please ensure to let us know your pledge and schedule. This will help us plan and acknowledge promptly.

 Western Union

You can also use this process for other Cash Transfer Options:

Email: info@micahglobal.org with the following information so we can collect the funds:
·       Full name of the sender (as written on the transfer request)
·       The 8-digit MTCN number
·       Sending Country
·       Exact amount sent (in currency) and amount to be received (in GBP)
To enable collection, you will need to include the Micah Treasurer's Name: Arnold David Boul - Country : United Kingdom

 Payment by Credit Card or PayPal Account:

You can make a payment via PayPal using a) your credit card or b) your PayPal account.
Note: PayPal offers the service of doing a regular monthly standing order.

DONATE VIA PAYPAL

 Pay by Credit Card through Stewardship

You can set up a direct debit or one off gift via Stewardship. For those working in the United Kingdom, by working through Stewardship Miah receives Gift Aid, so we encourage you to use this method if you are a tax payer.

DONATE VIA STEWARDSHIP

 Other Options

For several countries, it is difficult to send money internationally. If this is the case, please contact Micah Global and let’s discuss options as there is always a solution.

Thank you for taking the time to walk with Micah Financially.

Please email info@micahglobal.org if you have any queries.

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Spiritual Care Team Blesses Beirut

Spiritual Care Team Blesses Beirut

Spiritual Care Team Blesses Beirut - a Story of Kairos Opportunities By Dr. Jeff Hammond, Abbalove Ministries, Jakarta, Indonesia

At the WEA Conference in Jakarta last year, Spiritual Care Teams, consisting of people from many countries, prayed with delegates and speakers. These teams believed in the power of prayer to positively change situations, attitudes and to prepare delegates and speakers to have an even more dynamic encounter with the Lord, His Word and His people at the Conference.

From early in the Covid-19 crisis and the ensuing lockdowns, the Abbalove Church, saw the need to expand the role of Spiritual Care Teams to be an active element of the church’s ministry to make sure that no church member was left alone. Teams were organized to make sure that every member of the church was contacted, encouraged with Scripture and prayer, and their needs recorded and supplied. It was both powerful and effective. The fruit of this loving care was that teams expanded their care to the unreached. They sanitized homes, provided emergency food relief, prayed with the stressed and saw many coming to faith in Christ.

Today, after the massive bomb and destruction in Beirut, Lebanon, we have a new and exciting development of Spiritual Care Teams as they mobilize teams to minister to the people of the city of Beirut.

Let me introduce you to Pastor Chady El Aouad, the Senior Pastor of the Evangelical Abundant Life Church and Ministries, Beirut, Lebanon. I have witnessed the ministry of this church over a number of years and seen how they have cared for the suffering. I was invited to speak at a conference there during the Syrian crisis. It was moving to see the number of pastors who came from extremely dangerous situations and townships in Syria and Iraq that were being bombed. I asked one pastor where he would be staying after escaping Syria, and he replied, “No, I’m going back. The church needs their shepherds and the people need Christ more than ever.” These pastors were inspired by the love and commitment of Pastor Chady, and so they endured the dangers to come and willing to face the dangers in returning again to Syria.

Now, a new crisis has emerged. This time not in Syria, but just two minutes drive from Pastor Chady’s Church. By God’s grace, Pastor Chady was not in his office when the bomb exploded. The devastating blast blew through his church causing extensive damage throughout the building. His office, where normally he would have been working was filled with flying glass that could easily have killed him. But it was his birthday so he had taken the day off. Thank the Lord for birthdays!!!

Pastor Chady immediately began mobilizing his members to minister to a devastated city. Two weeks before the blast Abbalove had decided to stand with and support Pastor Chady as they ministered to the victims of the Covid-19 pandemic, massive corruption and the economic collapse of the nation. Immediately after the bomb, Abbalove doubled our support for Pastor Chady and the Abundant Life Church. We believed in his integrity, passion, commitment and ability to mobilize in the face of this horrific disaster.

Pastor Chady sent me a report of what had happened and how the church was responding:

“On the afternoon of the 4th August 2020, two explosions occurred at the port of the city of Beirut, the capital of Lebanon. The second explosion was extremely powerful, and caused at least 210 deaths, 6,000 injuries, US$30 billion in property damage, and left an estimated 300,000 people homeless. 

The event was linked to about 2,750 tons of ammonium nitrate. The explosion was detected by The United States Geological Survey as a seismic event of magnitude 3.3; and was felt in Turkey, Syria, Israel and parts of Europe. The explosion was even heard in Cyprus, more than 250 km (160 miles) away. It is considered to be one of the most powerful non-nuclear explosions in history.

The Abundant Life Church building, being close to the explosion (2 minutes driving distance, around 4 km away) and our Church families’ homes and properties suffered horrific destruction. Nevertheless, we decided that our first priority was to reach out and respond to the needs of our city.

We decided to move on as Elders, Pastors and Leaders of our Church and form teams with around 100 volunteers from our members as there was an urgent need to become the answer to the thousands of people that are affected by the explosion. Even now, many thousands are looking for help, answers, comfort, food, water and essentials for their daily life, after losing almost everything. For that reason we decided to move on four levels, prioritizing the needs of the people and valuing souls over our own Church Building devastation and catastrophe.

Level 1: The Devastated Community

We mobilized Spiritual Care Teams to go to the most devastated areas, with food, water and the New Testament, to comfort those families, give them food and water, pray with and for them and to see what other practical help we can provide them.

Level 2: Church Families

Another team began visiting our church families to help them repair their homes, properties, businesses and cars. Also, to pray with them and counsel them, especially as many are emotionally and mentally affected by the disaster.

Level 3: The Poor and Unemployed

We began to prepare boxes, parcels and hygiene that can sustain the poor and unemployed for one month,. So many were in poverty from the pandemic, corruption and economic collapse and after the bombing many more have lost their jobs and their means to support the lives of their families. 

 Level 4: The Church Building

After focusing on the above areas, we have also begun to clean our church building from all devastation and destruction and to seek to repair all the horrific damage and get the sanctuary ready again to be used. We want to restart our church services and ministries to be better able to be a blessing to our capital, our nation and the Middle East.

So far we are seeing tremendous results from the thousands of meals and bottles of water that we have distributed and the so many hundreds of boxes of parcels that our SCT’s have given away including thousands of New Testaments.

We are seeing so many coming to Jesus with tears, praying with us and asking for counseling. Many others even received healing once we prayed for them, and the amazing positive reports we are getting from our teams when they share the message of love and forgiveness with the most affected communities is so encouraging.

God is on the move and I really believe that Jesus is going to turn the aches into glory, the mourning into dancing, and the devastation into salvation. I am believing God for a spiritual awakening and a revival to be the result of this massive trauma and disaster. Jesus is still on the throne and I know He will make everything turn around for his glory, amen and amen.

Lebanon and the Middle East Shall be saved!”

Knowing Pastor Chady, I know these are not empty words. He has passion, compassion and faith that the Lord will continue to use them. He is a man of courage and vision with a great faith that their call is to share the Gospel throughout Lebanon and the Middle East.

Through this amazing ministry, and the mobilization of Spiritual Care Teams, many Lebanese are finding Christ. Let’s pray for them and stand with them in this kairos opportunity that has been thrust upon them.

Do not let them stand alone!

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The Unstoppable Spirit

The Unstoppable Spirit

The Unstoppable Spirit: Faith Communities on the Border Continue to Respond to Migrant Needs, No Matter What By Abara - August 2020

On Christmas Eve 2018, hundreds of migrants: men, women and children, who had fled violence, oppression, and hunger in their home countries were released on to the streets of El Paso, Texas, by Immigrations and Customs Enforcement (ICE) with nowhere to go. Hundreds more were released Christmas Day. And the day after that. And the day after that. The border was faced with a humanitarian crisis and faith communities had to decide how to respond.

Since the days of the Mexican Revolution, the border community of El Paso, Texas, and Juarez, Mexico, has been a crossroads for migrants and faith communities have always been an integral part of helping them find safe harbor. Casa del Migrante in Juarez and Annunciation House in El Paso, two of the longest serving shelters in the region, have received generations of migrants from Mexico, Central America and beyond fleeing violence, natural disasters, and economic hardship; however, in 2018, they found themselves stretched far beyond capacity. Congregations on both sides of the border worked together to create a system of temporary shelters to house migrants until they were able to arrange transportation to their immigration sponsors, typically located in other regions of the U.S. 

This network of temporary shelters and transportation, run primarily by faith communities worked well and served thousands of migrants until January 2019, when the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) implemented the Migrant Protection Protocols (MPP), better known as the “Remain in Mexico Policy” and overnight, thousands of migrants seeking asylum in the United States were stranded in Juarez while waiting for their day in court in the United States, as new migrants continued to arrive in Juarez daily also with nowhere to go. Shelters in El Paso were virtually empty and faith communities had to adapt quickly. Pastors and congregations in Juarez rose to meet the demands, sometimes at great personal cost, being threatened and attacked by groups that kidnapped, extorted, and murdered migrants.

For months, migrants camped out at international bridges and parks, while others sought out formal and informal shelters across the city. In Juarez, migrants are the target of discrimination, extortion, rape, and murder and a safe place to stay can be the difference between life and death. Blanca Castillo, a shelter resourcer at Abara Frontiers, who has been working on the ground in Juarez since 2018, described the response of pastors and churches to the crisis. “They really were the first-responders. They opened their spaces. They gave people a place to sleep and food to eat. They are on the ground day after day helping people get what they need.”

In addition to providing food and shelter, pastors, churches, and faith-based nonprofits have worked tirelessly to collaborate with international aid agencies like the UNHCR and International Organization on Migration and local, state and federal entities in Mexico, to connect migrants with medical care, education, employment opportunities and legal aid. Enrique Valenzuela, director of COESPO, a state agency in Chihuahua that has been at the forefront of migrant aid in Juarez, said, “We could not do what we do without the work of pastors, without the support of congregations, without people of faith. They are indispensable in this crisis.” 

Pastor Samuel, leader of the Frontera de Gracia congregation, and director of a migrant shelter with the same name, has been supporting migrants in Juarez since before the start of MPP. Unswayed by threats against his life, violent attacks, and now, COVID-19, Pastor Samuel continues to house, clothe, feed migrants in need. Since the beginning of the pandemic, Pastor Samuel has organized deliveries of food to migrants who are unable to stay in shelters because of capacity and/or safety concerns. Pastor Samuel estimates that the majority of migrants in Juarez are not in official shelters. “It’s hard to know. There’s so many. We are always meeting new people and help how we can.”   

Gustavo de los Rios, shelter resourcer at Abara Frontiers, and close friend of Pastor Samuel, described how COVID-19 has impacted shelters’ ability to help migrants. “They’re receiving less money because of the pandemic. Their congregations are under a lot of strain, but they’re still there every day doing what they can. We’ve been asking for money to buy food and basic supplies. It takes $1,000 a week to make sure that all of the people Pastor Samuel delivers to receive the food the need. They’re doing their best with less. He’s out there every day and I help him however I can.”

The COVID-19 pandemic has made life even more difficult for migrants, who were already precarious situations. Delays in the Mexican and United States court systems and tighter restrictions on border travel have left many migrants in limbo indefinitely. Juarez, which has been under National Code Red and Code Orange shutdown, has been hit hard by COVID-19 and is especially dangerous for migrants who have been deported from the U.S. who have to quarantine for 14 days before being allowed entrance into another shelter or to travel back home. To mitigate these increased dangers, the Mexican government has created new quarantine shelters and has designated certain existing shelters to also serve as quarantine shelters, known as “albergues filtros.” One of these shelters is Espiritu Santo, run by an Episcopalian congregation.  At Espiritu Santo, migrants are connected with medical care and COVID-19 testing while they quarantine and decide what steps to take next during this difficult time. 

Though they are not under as tight a lockdown as migrants living at filter shelters, migrants living at the Buen Pastor Shelter, run by a local Methodist congregation, have been severely impacted by COVID-19. In response, the shelter has taken a creative approach to helping migrant women earn money for their families during COVID-19 by launching a sewing workshop. 

Blanca Castillo, who helped launch the workshop reflected on its impact, “Right now, we have the capacity to work with about 10 women at a time, but we are looking to expand. The women we are working with right now are from a variety of backgrounds: Brazilians, Cubans, Venezuelans, Guatemalans, women who have migrated from other parts of Mexico. Some of them are under MPP and are waiting for their court dates and some of them are waiting until it’s safe to return to their countries. They’ve been making beautiful tote bags and we’re going to start making masks to sell at a store in El Paso. It’s really been a place for them to come together and heal. We’ve also had psychologists and social workers come and use this space to do therapy with people living in the shelter. Recently, we were able to do a spa self-care day with the ladies. We brought in a hairstylist, Keisha [Branch] who also works at Abara Frontiers, who gave everyone haircuts and we had stations for make-up and nails. It was something small, but they had so much fun and it lifted their spirits. It was a mini-getaway from shelter life. We could host classes in there and have legal aid and other resources present in there. There are so many opportunities and I’m excited to see what we can do in this space.”

In the midst of hardship, unspeakable violence, and now a pandemic, faith communities in El Paso and Juarez continue to seek ways to support and walk alongside migrant men, women and children who are so far from home with no end in sight. In the face of this uncertainty, we can draw inspiration from dedicated people like Pastor Samuel and church shelters, like Frontera de Gracia, Espiritu Santo, and Buen Pastor, and countless others, who propelled by faith, are out there on ground, every day, seeking to help others, no matter what.

To read this story on Abara’s website, click here.

https://www.abarafrontiers.org/the-unstoppable-spirit-faith-communities-on-the-border-continue-to-respond-to-migrant-needs-no-matter-what/

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The Overlooked

The Overlooked

Merath, Lebanon

The anti-racism protests in the USA are strongly resonating in Lebanon. Local voices are now rising up to denounce the underlying racism in the Lebanese society, which has overlooked for decades the many abuses faced by migrant domestic workers in the country. There are over 250,000 migrant domestic workers in Lebanon – mostly women – coming from African and Asian countries and working full time in private households. Although many of these women have been among the most vulnerable and marginalized in the country for a long time, the financial crisis and the COVID-19 outbreak have made their situation even more desperate.

The root of all abuses

Migrant domestic workers have been among the most vulnerable and marginalized in Lebanon for a long time, and many local and international NGOs have repeatedly reported numerous cases of abuses. Among the most common abuses are “extreme working hours and lack of rest days, severe restrictions on freedom of movement and communication, food deprivation and lack of proper accommodation, verbal and psychological abuse, physical violence, forced labor.” The situation is so bad that two migrant domestic workers die in Lebanon every week, by botched escape attempts, or suicide.

Twenty-six-year-old Djajida’s story is only one of many:

The most difficult thing was not being able to talk to anybody. I felt so alone. I did not have a phone, and I could only call my mother once a month for a few minutes. But my employer never called my mother with her real number, to make sure she could not reach me. I spent all my alone time crying. Every day used to start with my employer yelling at me for one reason or another. You know, I wouldn’t even have minded the workload and the poor treatment, if only I was getting paid and I could have sent money to my family in Kenya.

At the root of all these abuses is the Kafala sponsorship system: migrant workers coming to Lebanon are under the legal sponsorship of their employers who get to keep workers’ papers and passports. Migrant domestic workers are not protected by national labor laws and have nowhere to turn to in case of abuse. The fate of these women depends only on the goodwill of their employers, the “Madams” and “Misters” with which they live around-the-clock.

Debora, a young Ethiopian national working in Lebanon since 2016, sums it up well: “If your ‘Madam’ is good, working in Lebanon is nice and you can send much-needed money to your family back home. This is the only reason why we came here in the first place. If your ‘Madam’ is not good, your life can quickly turn to hell.”

 Reaching rock bottom

In Lebanon, COVID-19 erupted in the middle of a severe economic and financial crisis which already caused many Lebanese families to lose their jobs and income. Three months of lockdown have made the situation even worse: unemployment has risen to 35%, and around 50% of the country’s population, if not more, is now projected to be below the poverty line.

Countless Lebanese families can no longer afford to pay their domestic workers, and most of the families who still do pay them in Lebanese pounds, which has depreciated heavily in the last couple of months. Domestic workers in Lebanon either haven’t been paid for months or are earning only the equivalent of $50 a month, much less than their original contractual amount. In the worst cases, some women have been abandoned in the streets by their employers[2], without pay, their belongings, or even their passports, at a time when the airport remains closed and shelters are unavailable.

The situation is equally precarious for domestic workers who previously ran away from abusive employers and survive by relying on day-to-day cleaning work. Both the economic downturn and the lockdown have made such work unavailable for months.

How can we help?

To help meet the needs of some of the most vulnerable migrant workers in Lebanon, MERATH initiated a partnership with a local Christian NGO that closely supports a network of six churches of domestic workers from various nationalities. In the context of our broader COVID-19 response, we have been able to reach about 200 migrant workers with hygiene supplies, and over 20 with reusable masks and emergency food assistance. It is just a beginning, but it is already making a difference in their lives. Djajida confirms:

We already used the voucher to buy rice, beans, tomatoes, fish, and many other things. It has helped us feed ourselves and our baby boy.  We are so grateful for the people who are behind this, because it is not easy to give to help others, especially in these difficult times for everyone. We believe that God has a plan for our life, and will not abandon us. He has been faithful to us so far. This food voucher we received from you is yet another proof of that!

Meeting some of these women and hearing their stories has been both emotionally challenging and incredibly inspiring. We grieved with them, for the many injustices and humiliations they have faced. We laughed with them, amazed by their sense of humor. And we prayed with them, for a better tomorrow for them and their children.

Help us give them chances of a brighter future. Partner with us so we can support many more vulnerable migrant workers in Lebanon, for as long as they will need.

To read this news story on the Merath website, click here.

https://merathlebanon.org/2020/06/17/the-overlooked/

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Donate via Paypal – ARC 2020

Asia Regional Consultation 2020 - Pay via PayPal

You can make a payment via PayPal using a) your credit card or b) your PayPal account.

Check the amount that you need to pay, then select the DONATE  button below and you will be redirected to the payment gateway.  Thank you for registering for the Asia Regional Consultation 2020

Participants International:Participants Asia Region:
$ 25 Micah Member$ 15 Micah Member
$ 30 non Micah Member$ 20 non Micah Member
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New Hope in the Church

New Hope in the Church

NEW HOPE IN THE CHURCH - June 19, 2020

Published: The Warehouse

Walking into the old church community hall of St Peters Anglican Church in the heart of Mowbray on a Thursday evening, one will be welcomed by a community of people who gather to eat a wholesome hot meal together each week. Many live on the streets, some live in houses nearby and further afield. All want to share this meal and weekly connection. Rather than the traditional ‘soup kitchen’, the church have been gathering to eat together for eight years now. 

But if you walk into that hall today, you will see mattresses, room dividers and a cosy set up that has provided a safe community for ten men who live on the streets to weather the COVID-19 storm. As has been aptly said, we are all facing the same storm, but the boats in which we face the storm are worlds apart. 

“Opening the church up for this was not an unusual or strange thing to do,” explains Charlie Alexander, who works for the church and is part of the team serving at the microsite, “Because our Thursday night dinners together with our community of people who live on the streets, has been going on for years.”  

Whilst it may be something ‘new’ in that people have not slept in the church like this, it made sense to use the church as a place of refuge. “We consider our Thursday night dinners an expression of our church in the community, not as a side thing,” explains Charlie, “So, as soon as lock-down was announced, we began thinking about how we could as a church respond with our buildings and people,” says Charlie. “For me, the church continues to be open – when it came to the microsite, it was not a supernatural thing that happened – it was a logical thing to do because of our relationships with homeless people before COVID-19.” 

Richard Bolland, a member of St Peters and co-founder of an NGO that exists to help homeless people in Cape Town, and other church leaders and members, discussed how to create a safe space for people during this crisis. It was agreed that New Hope would run the microsite in partnership with the church. 

Hosting ten guests is no small task though. “I am one of the people on the leadership team of volunteers and people from New Hope – we share the load between us all – each taking a day of the week to make sure everything is working well and meals are prepared, and handling emergencies if they arise,” says Charlie, whose wife, Lauren, also serves in the personal growth support part of the community. “There are many people involved – this is church.”

There have been many encouraging things during this time and Charlie feels positive about the church community and New Hope, and how they have all pulled together with different gifts and resources. There is an amazing team of doctors, social workers, supervisors and volunteers who make sure everything happens and all guests are cared for well. Some are showing up to serve as leaders for the day each week, others are making meals, or giving equipment -like a lady in the church who helped get computers to the church for training – others are helping with maintenance, many are giving and serving in different ways. 

“The thing that encourages me the most is how things have worked out with finances, and how generous people have been, even in the midst of the current economic challenges. People are generally holding onto what they have, so that it can last, but with the microsite we have seen enormous sharing.”

With space for only ten people, the team did interviews and screenings to see who the situation would best suit, something that was not easy to navigate as the team hoped for consistency of lockdown community. “We lost one dear man due to illness during this time, which caused us a lot of sadness and collective grief.” After the funeral one other of their guests decided to leave, and a new round of interviews were done, and one more person added to the group. 

The guests who were either living on the streets, or at the Strandfontein camp before the microsite opened, are enjoying three meals a day and snacks and warm drinks, with ample opportunities to be involved in workshops, skills groups if they want to. There are two main purposes for the microsite – firstly, relief : making sure people can leave the streets for the period of the lockdown and get the help they need, and the second, ensuring that people have the opportunity to leave the streets in the long term. “The guys are navigating their lives on the streets, and we have to understand that certain things have happened to them, they have faced many setbacks, and they are trying hard to survive, so what the microsite does is give them a space to find rest and food and safety, and hopefully, post COVID-19, they can get training and find what they want to and can do – the possibilities are endless.”

Charlie’s experience has been enriched by watching the personal growth in relationships developed within the group and how calling out who we ‘are’ as opposed to who we are ‘not’ has helped build personal relationships. “It’s a bit like that for the church too – if we call out the church for who we are, and not what we are displaying that is not who we are meant to be.” Charlie’s prayer is that this time will cause the church to re-examine more and more who we are – as the Church, and explore how we can use our partnerships, buildings, space and more beyond COVID-19. 

“I believe this time is reminding the Church about who we really are,” says Charlie, “And I sense we are working towards a new expression of church, becoming more of who God designed us to be.” 

This enriching time has left Charlie asking many questions, such as, Does the existence of a pandemic change the fact that people are suffering on the streets? People’s lives are at risk living outside without COVID-19. What happens beyond COVID-19? How can we ‘be’ church when some of us are living outside? 

“What does ‘going back to normal’ look like and do we want that?” 

“The microsite is running well; we have plenty resource and volunteers and it’s working so well with teamwork and effort. So what happens after the COVID-19 crisis? Will we carry on? How can we continue to use the space we have once this particular storm is over, together as a church community in a sustainable way?”

……………………………………………………………………………….................................................................................................................................................................

New Hope: New Hope is committed to “Learning to be human together. Giving and receiving hope. Together, developing dignified alternatives to homelessness.” https://www.newhopesa.org/

St Peters Community Dinners: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XogSh7AbZ-A

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Asia Regional Consultation 2020

Asia Regional Consultation October 2020

Integral Mission and the Public Square

What is the role of Christians in advocacy and change in the public square?

Government structures, civil society and community gatherings at a grass-roots level are all spheres of the public square that shape community wellbeing. Our regional consultation seeks to unpack the why and the how of public square dynamics and explore what the church’s role is in the public square within the Asian context.

As a minority faith group, often restricted and marginalised, the space to engage is sometimes assumed to be too difficult. Through robust discussion, drawing on theology and good practice examples, we hope to discern what God is calling us to say and do, both regionally and nationally in Asia.

ARC FINAL Save the Date August 2020

Dates: Thursday 15, Friday 16 October & Thursday 22 and Friday 23 October 2020.

Where: Online on the Zoom digital platform - Access will be sent via email on confirmation of registration.

Due to the ongoing Coronavirus pandemic we will not be meeting together in Taiwan as planned.  As the world has been forced to face such hard-hitting change, we have adapted the gathering to be hosted online, changed the timing and reworked the programme. We will miss being together physically for this regional consultation, but know we will all gain much from being together online. We trust God to restore and re-envision us to be "salt and light" during these very difficult times. 

Themes to be focused on during the Consultation

Understanding the Public Square, Democratic Processes, Anti-corruption issues, Peace and Reconciliation, Creation Care, and more.

Reflections drawing on Biblical characters and their public square engagement, plenaries to unpack daily core themes, break-away groups for discussion, devotional reflection and worship, and more. 

Call for Papers and Case Studies

Delegates are invited to send papers and case studies on the topics to Micah Global before the 5th October. A selection of these will be shared with all participants. There will be no presentations of papers due to the online forum change, but please send papers to news@micahglobal.org 

Who should be there?

Aid and mission organisation leaders and practitioners, Church leaders and pastors, Social activists with a heart for change, Youth leaders in Christian movements and churches, Theologians and lecturers, Young people who are passionate about justice, poverty reduction and conflict resolution.

Download the Information Flyer here

Register for the event here

Pay for your registration

Participants International: $ 25 Micah Member || $ 30 Non-member

Participants Asia Region: $ 15 Micah Member || $ 20 Non-member

Note: Please use ARC and your Last Name  as a Payment Reference or use ARC and your Organisation Name if you are paying for multiple people.

When making payment for more than one delegate, please email events@micahglobal.org with the names of the delegates to be assigned to this payment.  Kindly also ensure each delegate has completed a registration form.

Pay via PayPal and credit card

Registration options
Payment reference

Direct Transfer to Micah’s Bank Account:

You can make a transfer directly to Micah’s GBP bank account.
The Co-operative Bank PLC
IBAN Number: GB81CPBK 089299 65114559
Swift code: CPBKGB22
Business Direct, P O Box 250
Skelmersdale WN8 6WT, UK
Sort Code: 08-92-99
Account number: 65114559
Account name: The Micah Network

Enquiries

English: events@micahglobal.org

Mandarin: RD_Planning@mustard.org.tw

Hosted by Micah Global, Micah Asia and the Mustard Seed Mission

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How do you read it?

On one occasion an expert in the law stood up to test Jesus.
“Teacher,” he asked, “what must I do to inherit eternal life?”  
“What is written in the Law?” he replied. “How do you read it?”
(Luke 10: 25-26)

As a rabbi, Jesus answered the law expert's question with another one. In fact, with two other questions. The first was easy to answer. The expert knew what was written in the Law and quoted the text perfectly. The second one was more demanding. It touched the way he understood it. And it is this question that I invite you to think about. How have we been reading the Scriptures?

Some time ago I heard a Brazilian Christian leader, whom I greatly admire, answering the question: ‘What is the problem with Brazilian evangelical Christians?” The question had been asked in response to the clear division and antagonistic positions of evangelicals and evangelical leaders in the public environment, among other issues. He was straightforward: "The Bible". It took me a few minutes to understand his response in depth. And I understood it by remembering that conversation between Jesus and the expert in the law. Read more...

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