Proselytism

Proselytism

Context

The arrest of Shelter Now workers in Afghanistan for ‘proselytising’ in August 2001 led to intense media interest in the way Christian aid and development organisations work in a country without religious freedom. The ensuing coverage was generally critical of Christian organisations and saw them as guilty, at worst, of using people’s vulnerability in order to entice them to change their religion or, at best, of hiding their true intentions from the authorities. This paper seeks to give guidance with reference to this issue for Micah Network members.

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Integral Mission, Relief And Development

Integral Mission, Relief And Development

by Dave Andrews

"Our Father who is in heaven,

May your name be honoured.

May your Kingdom come,

May your will be done,

On earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread

And forgive us our debts,

as we also forgive our debtors.

And lead us not into temptation

but deliver us from evil."

(Matthew 6 v 7-13.)

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Confusing Asiku: how mission and development intervention in international languages works to bypass the minds of beneficiaries

Confusing Asiku: how mission and development intervention in international languages works to bypass the minds of beneficiaries

By Gary Cowman, SIL International  and Jim Harries, Alliance for Vulnerable Mission
2015 

 This paper looks at the challenges faced by external holistic ministry and development workers who do not speak the local language. The implications of using the international, rather than local, language are explored as they impact the people in the local community and external workers. A conversational approach is used to bring understanding to difficult questions related to topics such as whether linguistic diversity leads to conflict, the cost/benefit of learning the local language, managing donor expectations in light of what is in the best interest of the local community, the importance of contextually relevant communications material in terms of both language and culture, and the pertinence of globalisation to the local communities we come alongside of to serve.

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Christian Wholistic Development

Christian Wholistic Development

CRUDAN
2002

This booklet has been written and produced as a result of two things.

Firstly, it has come out of the work that CRUDAN has done in promoting Christian Wholistic Development over the past decade. Secondly it has come out of CRUDAN’s observations of the need for more and more of the church to see the mandate of God to be involved in their communities and in society and to consider some of the methodologies that are biblical, practical and proven. CRUDAN observed this need at their outset in 1990, but despite a lot of work, the same need is still as glaring.

All of what is written here is as a result of both research and practical experience. It is based as far as possible on the Bible and seeks to bring a different perspective to development, a thoroughly Christian and biblical perspective. Many Christians are afraid to get involved in development work because they are not sure if it is a Christian activity and they do not want to ‘compromise’ their faith. Even when people are involved it is often seen as a second priority. Here, we argue that it is a very Christian activity, and outline why that is so, suggest what is involved and how to become involved.

Our heart’s desire as CRUDAN is for the church to believe that Christian wholistic development is an imperative for them to be part of and to start to make an impact in the lives of the people, especially the poor, in their communities. CRUDAN offers its services of awareness raising, training and supporting (counselling) to any church that wants to take up this biblical mandate and make a difference in people’s lives for the glory of God.

Christian wholistic development is a broad concept, demonstrated by Robert Moffitt’s definition. He defines it as “every biblically based activity of the body of Christ, his church, that assists in bringing human beings towards the place of complete reconciliation with God and complete reconciliation with their fellows and their environment.” If you are interested in how we as Christians should relate to either God, others or the environment, then this book is for you!

 

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Discussion on “Proclamation”

Discussion on “Proclamation”

By Chris Sugden
2011

For all the emphasis and investment by the church on development and justice, the development of communities of Christian faith is seen as neither a result nor an expression of Christian action for development and justice. The establishment
and growth of a Christian community is not seen as central to bringing about development or justice. Rather the church is regularly subverted and neutered by the development movement and sometimes Christians collude in this.
 
Some Christians accept partnership and involvement on the basis of value-based development. But values do not exist in isolation in the abstract. They inhere in people, actions and relationships. They need to be grounded in the truth about
humanity and the world. For Christian faith this truth is not abstract. It is found in a person in history, Jesus, in a relationship with him, and in belief in his active involvement in the world through his Spirit.

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Confundiendo a Asiku: Cómo la Intervención y Desarrollo en Lenguas Internacionales Llevan a la Evasión de las Mentes de los Beneficiarios

Confundiendo a Asiku: Cómo la Intervención y Desarrollo en Lenguas Internacionales Llevan a la Evasión de las Mentes de los Beneficiarios

Por Gary Cowman y Jim Harries
2015

Asiku está encantada de que los sanitarios hayan venido a su aldea. La enfermedad que se ha apoderado de muchos de sus familiares y amigos ya ha matado a varias personas, y los extranjeros dicen que la misma puede detenerse. Pocas personas en su comunidad hablan bien inglés. Esto significa que cuando los extranjeros hablan de lo que se puede hacer acerca de la enfermedad, Asiku espera hasta que uno de los lugareños que hablan inglés escuche y traduzca el mensaje. Las palabras de uso médico que suelen usarse resultan muy difícil de traducir ya que muchas veces sus significados en la lengua de Asiku no son muy claros; por lo cual, el traductor suele sólo usar la palabra en inglés que Asiku no entiende todavía. La mayoría de los familiares y amigos de Asiku quedan confundidos después de que los extranjeros hablan porque no saben lo que se supone que deben hacer diferente, pero no quieren que se vayan o se ofendan. Todos sonríen de modo alentador y asientan para afirmar que lo que están haciendo los extranjeros es importante. Asiku está segura de que el extranjero trae una información importante y útil que no están entendiendo ¿pero cómo puede acceder a ella? 

 

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Ten theological theses on Mission and Development

Ten theological theses on Mission and Development

By Steve de Gruchy
September 2004

The task of this paper is to provide the contours of a biblical and theological grounding for the involvement of the Church - and by this I mean the community of Christian people - in the work of development, which I define as “social, cultural, religious, ecological, economic and political activities that consciously seek to enhance the self-identified livelihoods of the poor”. To do this, I propose ten theological theses on mission and development.

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