Churches Living with HIV

Churches Living with HIV

By Gracia Violeta Ross
2008

1. Who is Gracia Violeta? Who am I and why it might be interesting to learn from my experience
2. Partnerships, what are our expectations?
3. Advocacy and partnership, why do we need your help?
4. What you can do next week to make this partnership happen
5. A special Partnership urgently needed between women and men

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Roles of Churches in a World Living with HIV/AIDS

Roles of Churches in a World Living with HIV/AIDS

By REV. FRANCIS MKANDAWIRE, General Secretary, Evangelical Association of Malawi
2008

The Lord Jesus Christ makes a powerful declaration of his mission on earth in John 10:10: “I have come that they may have life and have it abundantly.” This is what he came to do and called upon his disciples to continue doing even after his ascension. “As the Father sent me, so I send you.” We are called upon, by our master, to lead men and women, boys and girls, through out the world to “live abundant lives in Christ.”

Abundant, life here, does not mean a life without challenges, but rather a life of unspeakable “peace and joy” as in Isaiah 9:1-7. Integral Mission, is about bringing about the ‘shalom’ of God upon communities, often amidst hardships and intense suffering, including the challenges poised by the HIV/AIDS pandemic, especially in third world countries.

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Present and future challenges – The scale, impact and need for new approaches in the global HIV epidemic

Present and future challenges – The scale, impact and need for new approaches in the global HIV epidemic

By Andrew Tomkins, Institute of Child Health, University College, London UK
September 2002

The global HIV epidemic is the greatest threat to health, family life and economic survival that the World has ever known. Its pattern varies between countries according to mode of transmission and ability of civil society to respond. The poorest are the most affected. Achieving behaviour change is difficult but vital. Christian organisations have introduced novel programmes for prevention but there is little documentation of any impact. Christian organisations also play a front line role in the care of individuals and families affected by HIV/AIDS with a special focus on orphans but there is little documentation on whether the care provided is sufficient to promote child development adequately. There are, globally, many resources available - human, physical, spiritual and financial - but these are not all being released. This is possibly due to a lack of a clear evidence base for what effect individuals and communities can achieve. As the epidemic spreads there is an urgent need to develop and promote support for those interventions which are effective. There is now great opportunity for Christian organisations to introduce new approaches in programme design, analysis, evidence-base, reflection and reform of HIV/AIDS programmes.

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HIV/AIDS, the Biblical Mandate and Social Action

HIV/AIDS, the Biblical Mandate and Social Action

By Ediomo-Ubong Nelson
2007

The concept of social justice refers to “fairness in the distribution of society’s benefits and burdens”. In recent history, few phenomena have highlighted the nature of injustice in the human society like HIV/AIDS. The different dimensions of the epidemic reveal the fissures of inequities and injustices in the organization of society at all levels. For example, gender disparity in the distribution of the disease burden is now common knowledge. Sexual intercourse is the most dominant mode of transmission of the disease and women are at greater risk of infection with HIV through sex.

What are the roles of the church in this process? Are we to view the epidemic as a challenge or an opportunity? What is the rationale for a Christian action to stem the impact of HIV/AIDS in our society? Is there a biblical mandate for the church to act in times like these? If there is, what have we done with it? In what ways are we actively engaging with the problem of HIV/AIDS in our domains? These questions should constantly exercise our minds as we consider integral mission and the place of the church.

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HIV – A Call to Action

HIV – A Call to Action

World Evangelical Alliance

While we have not always acknowledged it, we recognise today that the Body of Christ, His Church, is living with HIV. With brokenness we admit that as Evangelical Christians we have allowed stigmatisation and discrimination to characterise our relationships with people living with HIV. We repent of these sinful attitudes and commit to ensuring that they are changed. We will follow Jesus’ example and identify with those who are affected (Matthew 9:12-13) as we intercede fervently for one another (Romans 8:26).

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HIV/AIDS CARE and SUPPORT PROGRAMMES – And ORPHAN CARE

HIV/AIDS CARE and SUPPORT PROGRAMMES - And ORPHAN CARE

By David Kabiswa, AIDS Care Education and Training, (ACET) Uganda
September 2000

AIDS today continues to kill about 2 million people a year in Africa. Women are the most affected with an ever-increasing rate of infection. There is a change in family demographics and social set-up of family units. The terminology of care and prevention, once miles apart are seemingly so intertwined as the links between HIV/AIDS and poverty follow a similar pattern. In the midst of all this there is hope. There always is hope. The paper looks at a historical approach in this journey to hope. The role of the Church cannot be underestimated. It is imperative and this is the premise of the entire presentation.

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Micah Network Global Consultation on HIV and AIDS – Churches Living with HIV

Micah Network Global Consultation on HIV and AIDS – Churches Living with HIV

210 participants from 51 countries convened in Pattaya, Thailand, for Micah Network’s Global Consultation on HIV and AIDS, held on 21 – 24 October 2008. Members of the Micah Network joined together with delegates to the World Evangelical Alliance (WEA) General Assembly, people living with HIV, and Christian theological educators for a valuable time of learning, planning, discussion and worship. The emphasis of the consultation was on building partnerships to support evangelical communities to make life, love and justice available to all individuals and communities living with HIV, who are within the wide reach of the church. This emphasis on partnerships is reflected in some of the outcomes of the meeting.

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