Climate Action is our Mandate

Climate Action is our Mandate

by The Eficor Team, India

Introduction

Things have changed. It has become much hotter. We no longer know when it will rain. The streams have dried up. The forests have been replaced by roads and instead of trees there are concrete jungles. These are just some of the things that we hear when we conduct workshops on Creation Care and ask people to think about the changes in their local environment. Not once have I heard anyone say that things have changed for the better. The changes are real and the changes are devastating. However, it is also true that for many of us things like Climate Change are (for now) just an inconvenience’. If it gets too hot, we will just place more air-conditioners in our homes and offices and run them as long as we need to. If it gets too cold, we will find ways of heating our homes better. And many will travel in air-conditioned cars protecting us from the extreme weather and pollution. And while some can 'shield' ourselves from the impact, Climate Change is making life harder for many around the world. Extreme weather events like floods – occurring ever more frequently - have led to huge losses for farmers. Unpredictable monsoons that either come too early or too late have consistently affected production. An inconvenience for some of us is a death sentence for many – especially the poor. Whatever the debates around Climate Change, however much our apathy to face it - should we not address this issue simply because the Bible talks about stewardship of creation and simply because the impact of Climate Change is affecting the poor the most? How about we – as stewards of God’s creation - inform, engage and challenge one another to stir to action and realise that Climate Change does matter – to us and to God. Read the article
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Poverty wealth and responsibility in Mission

Poverty wealth and responsibility in Mission

Introduction.

Recently I was deeply moved by an advert that was screened on South Africa television. It shows a young black South African mother living in a shack in one of the many informal settlements that are so common on the outskirts of South African towns and cities. She lovingly dresses her son in threadbare clothes and shoes. She makes him a sandwich with her last two slices of bread, and takes him to a local train station. At the station she seats the toddler on a railway bench and gently instructs him to wait there, supposedly she is going to buy a ticket. The viewer catches a glimpse of the station clock in the background; it is early in the morning. The storyline of the advert progresses with the little child obediently waiting for his mother’s return, behind him the viewer can see the hours passing on the station clock until the day is at its end and the little child is still sitting all alone on the railway bench waiting for his mother. The advert ends with a message reminding the viewer that in South Africa extreme poverty is a daily reality for the large majority of the population, and that some parents would rather abandon their children to the care of strangers than see them starve to death. The advert intended to remind the viewers that we have a collective responsibility for one another’s wellbeing. The sad message of this advert is borne out in a telling article in the Cape Times newspaper  December 6, 2006 p.6ii) reporting on the findings of research conducted by the National Treasury of South Africa. The research indicated that the most common reason why South African’s borrow money is to buy food!

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Church Planting in Urban Slums: A Case Study with Living Bread Ministries

Church Planting in Urban Slums: A Case Study with Living Bread Ministries

By G. Patrick Hubbard, II
2013

The aim of this article is to describe the process Living Bread Ministries (LBM) utilizes to church plant in the Brazilian favelas (Portuguese term meaning slum or shanty town). Our church plants in urban areas of southern Brazil demonstrate three primary aspects of church planting. One piece is identifying, training, and mentoring pastors in slum communities. A second facet of church planting is the process of evangelism, discipleship, and social ministry. A third feature is the role of global partnerships in the church planting process. A study of these three aspects provides a well rounded overview of LBM’s church planting efforts among the desperately poor in Brazil.

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The Shining Light Project, Cambodia

The Shining Light Project, Cambodia

By David Crooks
September 2009

“From Seed Project to a Real Seed”
Svay Att is a 199-family strong village in Pursat province of Cambodia. Most of its residents are poor farmers, some of whom migrated to Thailand in search of work, leaving their young ones and the elderly. Through the evangelistic efforts of Im Seila, the pastor of the local Methodist church, the number of new believers increased. Soon, many of them faced persecution; the church also had increasing restrictions placed on it.

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Case Study – Project HALO strengthening community coping mechanisms

Case Study - Project HALO strengthening community coping mechanisms

By Craig Greenfield
2002

Servants to Asia's Urban Poor is an international network of Christian teams living and working in Asia’s city slums. We strive to do small things with great love - to empower the poor to help themselves. Servants entered Cambodia in 1993, under an agreement with the Ministry of Health to provide health services in the poorest district of Phnom Penh. As well as initiating a number of health and development programs, we have tried to live amongst the poor, sharing their lives, their joys and their struggles.

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Bridging the Gap: Integral Mission with the Poor

Bridging the Gap: Integral Mission with the Poor

By Tim Costello
2001

I would like to consider this topic by reflecting on probably the most famous story Jesus told, colloquially called The Good Samaritan (Luke 10). This story was precipitated by two questions that highlight the gap between engagement with the poor and my evangelical upbringing. At first sight, the two questions seem so different and almost unrelated that one wonders if the Good Samaritan story is indeed a response to both.

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Art and God’s Mission: Connecting art and local-church worship to poverty and injustice

Art and God's Mission: Connecting art and local-church worship to poverty and injustice

General Objectives:

1. Mission: Exploring God’s mission and how art fits into it.
2. Art: Exploring the nature of art and the role it plays in social issues.
3. Worship: Exploring what worship is and how it connects to poverty, injustice, and violence.

Specific Outcome-based Objectives:

By the end of the seminar participants will have:
1. Compared God’s mission with much of the church’s understanding of it.
2. Explored how ideas travel and the role of the ‘balladeer,’ and identify some examples of both.
3. Explored the power of art and identified its function in addressing social issues.
4. Defined worship and identified how worship in a local church setting can link to issues of poverty, injustice, and violence.

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Progredindo de visão para a prática: tornando “Abundância de vida” em pratica

Progredindo de visão para a prática: tornando “Abundância de vida” em pratica

Mark Galpin
United Mission to Nepal (Missão Unida para Nepal)
2015

Este documento examina a experiência da Missão Unida para Nepal (MUN) indo do conceito de “abundância de vida” sendo apenas uma declaração esotérica de intento com pouca conexão ao trabalho em campo ao ponto de ela fixar-se praticamente no conceito organizacional e tornando-se em um impulso maior no nosso trabalho em geral. Este documento explora ligeiramente o contexto onde operamos e como isto têm influenciado a nossa jornada, o processo pelo qual temos passado no desenvolvimento de modelos práticos entre pobreza e abundância de vida, e depois descreve os modelos em si. Depois o documento examina como estes modelos têm sido usados dentro da organização, e como elas impactam no nosso trabalho. O documento conclui descrevendo as lições aprendidas neste processo e fazendo recomendações para outras organizações interessadas em fazer com que as suas operações em campo conectam melhor com os princípios bíblicos de Abundância de vida e/ ou shalom enquadrado em suas visões e declarações de missão.

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